Hip fractures, like breaking any bone, cause pain and make putting weight on the leg extremely difficult. If an individual is alone when the fracture occurs and unable to call for help, it can be a life-threatening situation.

In older patients, a hip fracture can result from something as simple as losing one’s balance and falling to the ground. However, it is possible that a femur weakened by osteoporosis actually caused the hip to break first, resulting in the fall to the ground.

The diagnosis of a hip fracture typically occurs in the emergency room. Do not to try to walk on a fractured hip, or the two sides of the fracture may displace, or move apart. Displacement increases the risk of damaging the blood supply to the femur (thigh bone). A fracture that has not displaced is much easier to treat.

Once a Lancaster Orthopedic Group surgeon has been able to assess your overall physical condition and determines that you are medically stable, decisions about treatment of the fracture can be made.

Hip fractures usually require surgery, and most fractures are treated in one of three ways: with metal pins, with a metal plate and screws, or by replacing the broken femoral head with an artificial implant. The goal is to help you get moving and walking as quickly as possible.